Hey everyone,

First off, it’s been an incredible few months since the release of The Germ Files. I’ve been touring all over Ontario and have been thrilled to meet hundreds of people all interested in our daily relationship with microbes. Also, I was pleasantly surprised to see a very kind review in the Washington Post.

Washington-Post

You can read the entire piece here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/why-we-should-love-germs/2016/02/29/f2c3b662-db27-11e5-891a-4ed04f4213e8_story.html

Over the course of the tour, one section seemed to gain interest with some of the audience members. It had to do with making fermented foods from microbes isolated from human fecal matter. The idea of finding new bacteria in the gut did have an expected effect…

 

monkees-nope(if you don’t know who these gents are, ask your grandparents)

But those feelings passed once I explained the lengthy process of isolating, purifying, and then testing a particular species. By the time fermentation happened, the bacterium had no direct links to the source an definitely would not have any related tastes. This practice is normal for any company wishing to use ‘human strains’ for their fermented foods and of course, probiotics.

However as in life there are always exceptions and just this past week, one seemingly has appeared.

bottled-instinctThe Order of Yoni Beer by Bottled Instinct

It’s well known beer is usually fermented with yeast. However, there are certain styles, such as the one pictured above, made with what is known as a sour mash. It’s particularly popular with home brewers though there are some larger companies using this technique to make a variety of choices. It’s also used to make certain American Whiskeys.

The key to a sour mash is the formation of lactic acid. To accomplish this, several species of bacteria have been used throughout the ages. One happens to be Lactobacillus acidophilus. The name may sound familiar because it is also a probiotic and as many on the tour have learned, is my favorite microbe.

jason-acidophilusMe and my L. acidophilus

The bacterium can also be found in a few places within the human body. The first is the same as I mentioned above. The company didn’t look there.

For those fluent in Hindi, the name of the beer, The Order of Yoni, gives away the other location. If you’re not up to speed on the Indian language, the word Yoni literally means the womb.

From a scientific perspective, the idea isn’t all that odd. After all, a sour mash made from isolates of Lactobacillus acidophilus acquired from a human female’s genitourinary microbiome may not seem all that bad. It might make for an interesting science or art project. After all, there have been such endeavours conducted in the past albeit not with this particular region of the body.

However, the company selling the product doesn’t quite explain it in the same way. Here’s a quote from their site:

“Using hi-tech of microbiology, we isolate, examine and prepare lactic acid bacteria from a unique woman. The bacteria, lactobacillus, transfer woman’s features, allure, grace, glamour, and her instincts into beers and other products, turning them into dance with lovely goddess.”

Needless to say…

carrie-wth(If you don’t know who this is, ask your parents)

As you might expect from the description and the model, this venture is all about trying to bottle the essence of beauty and provide it in a relatively easy to digest format. The company goes even further to name the person from whom the sample will be taken…a model named Alexandra Brendlova. If you don’t know who she is, here’s a promotional photo.

yoni-model

While this may be enough to convince people to give this a try, from a scientific perspective, the only place you’re going to feel anything is your wallet.

If you go deeper into the site, the company explains the process of isolating this unique Lactobacillus acidophilus for brewing. It’s no different than trying to isolate a bacterium from that other region. The samples are cultured, and the bacteria are isolated, and then grown until they reach the right levels to be used in the first stages of fermentation. This ensures safety but also takes away any links the species may have had to the owner.

There is one bright side to this venture. This concept shows just how popular microbes have become over the last decade. It really makes me wanna…

5sos(If you don’t know who these guys are, ask your kids)

While this particular product may not provide anything more than an intriguing sour mash beer, the interest from the media and those actually investing in the company reveals this may be the beginning of mainstream human microbial artisanal gastronomy.

If you are interested in going this route, I’d love to hear about it. Just be sure not to overstate the benefits. Though bacteria may come from a specific individual or type of person, don’t expect to transfer their outwardly qualities. A person may gain health benefits and perhaps help to change several biological parameters. But in terms of features, allure, grace, and glamour, no amount of Lactobacillus or any other microbe for that matter is going to help.

If this was the case, fecal transplantation would be a far more common practice.

 

 

Would love to hear your thoughts…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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