Late last year, something unbelievable happened. As news spread, the world woke up to a new reality. Nothing would ever be the same again.

Most people were shocked by the revelation, as it was thought to be impossible. Yet a handful of people knew this would occur. Almost no one believed in them but they continued on tirelessly. They did everything they could to skew the odds in their favour. They hacked what was once thought to be an impenetrable defense and used viral tools to ensure success. In the end, their efforts paid off and these once slighted individuals reaped the rewards with almost sinful delight.

If you haven’t already guessed what that event was, I’ll fill you in…

(The Ebola Vaccine was 100% Effective!)

Believe it or not, vaccination proved to be perfect in the most recent clinical trial. For researchers, public health officials, and even the World Health Organization, this was a hallmark moment. It was time for a…

celebration(Celebration!)

If you hadn’t heard of this incredible news, you can’t be blamed.  The article came out right before Christmas. Most people including the media were rightfully focused on the festive season of the Holidays. They also were dealing with the hangover of another world-changing event that happened six weeks earlier…

trump-pres(Which, if you didn’t know, culminates today…)

If you think about it, there were similarities between these two events. The premise of a President Trump or a 100% effective vaccine was considered ludicrous just a year before. Although both had shown themselves to be capable of achieving these heights, few really believed they would succeed. Yet, as the human tallies came in, the picture became clear. At the end of it all, there was only one word to describe what had occurred…

 dali(Surreal…)

But there is one significant difference between these two announcements. One has created a significant amount of debate, backlash, and concern while the other has created a sense of hope not seen since…

hope(Susan Lucci’s Winless Streak Ended…)

Putting the parallels with American politics and daytime soap operas aside, there are three reasons behind the optimism from the Ebola vaccine. The first and most obvious is a future in which epidemics like the one seen in 2014-2016 may never happen again. After everything the people in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia went through (and yes, America), this announcement provides…

relief(Some welcome relief…)

The second has to do with the ability of a vaccine to protect. For what might be the first time, there is an option with 100% effectiveness. This has always been the goal of researchers but until recently, figuring out how to develop the perfect candidate has been nearly impossible. A new benchmark has been set against which future vaccines will be evaluated. Granted, finding a way to protect against Ebola is much easier than say…

flu(A constantly evolving virus…)

Yet even flu researchers are getting closer to a universal vaccine that may one day protect us against all possible variations of this more common – and possibly more troublesome – pathogen.

The final reason deals with the nature of the vaccine. It was made through a combination of different genetic engineering processes. The virus used isn’t even Ebola but one that is harmless to humans. Although it is officially known as a recombinant, some might prefer to call it a…

gmo(Genetically Modified Organism…)

As you probably know, there is a significant amount of debate on GMOs with good reason. These products have entered the agricultural industry and the food marketplace without much consultation or information being given to the public. Not surprisingly, some have reacted quite negatively to this and called for an all out ban on genetic engineering.

But thanks to this vaccine, we can realize not all genetically modified organisms are bad. After all, if you want to look at a GMO, all you need to do is…

timberlake(You are not a clone…)

Perhaps this good news GMO story may balance the scales a little. Maybe those calling for an end to this technique will realize it only can hurt scientific advancement and put other discoveries such as this vaccine in peril.

I hope all people will understand the need for genetic engineering in health and medicine and appreciate the potential it brings. Most importantly, I wish all those who are skeptical of scientific research understand for the most part, the work, while at times seemingly out of touch with reality, ultimately is attempting to improve our world and make it a better place for all.

Okay, I know that may have sounded like an…

inaurgural(Inaugural speech…)

But as this day only comes once every four years, I figured it would be worth the risk.

If you want to read more on the vaccine, you can check out the World Health Organization for more details:  Final trial results confirm Ebola vaccine provides high protection against disease.

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