Whenever there is a crisis, people start to play the blame by association game. It’s a natural process. But sometimes, the game gets a little…

preposterous(Out of hand…)

A perfect example of this happened a few weeks ago. In response to the antibiotic resistance crisis, a few researchers decided to publish a paper entitled…

Evaluation of the Effect of Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted From
Wi-Fi Router and Mobile Phone Simulator on the Antibacterial Susceptibility
of Pathogenic Bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli

You can click on the title to read the whole study. But as the name implies, researchers have attempted to link the use of Wi-Fi and Mobile Phones to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance.

Just hearing this concept may make you want to say…

malarkey(Or balderdash for that matter…)

Yet, a few years ago, researchers did happen to notice an odd occurrence in bacteria placed in the presence of both Wi-Fi and cell phone radiation. The bacteria somehow gained the ability to resist antibiotics. At the time, it was considered to be a…

fluke(Fasciola hepatica to everyone else…) 

However, as with all experimental science, the results did create some interest and led to the aforementioned study.

The bacteria were placed in a zone where either Wi-Fi or cell phone radiation could be absorbed. At the same time, antibiotics were administered in an assay known as a…

zone-inhibition(Zone of Inhibition Test…)

Sensitivity and resistance are measured by the size of the zone of inhibition. The larger the diameter, the more sensitive the bacteria to the antibiotic. If there’s no zone, the bacteria are completely resistant.

The team focused on Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, two well known pathogens with a penchant for antibiotic resistance. No one actually expected the bacteria to gain resistance and yet…well, it gets weird…

ecoli-gsm
(This is E. coli in the presence of cell phone radiation…)

As you can see, the inhibition zone shrank for all the antibiotics after as little as three hours. This meant the bacteria had somehow figured out a way to resist the drugs. We’re not talking just penicillin but stronger types such as ciprofloxacin, or as we like to call it, cipro.

If you look at the 6 hour mark, you might decide the best thing to do is…

power-off(But can you get out of your contract?)

Mind you, this effect was short-lived. By 9 hours, the resistance began to wane and by 12 hours, there was no difference from the start of the test. As for the Wi-Fi, this is what the researchers observed…

ecoliwifi
(Not so bad…)

In contrast to the E. coli experiments, Listeria monocytogenes was not affected dramatically by the presence of either type of radiation. The bacteria seemingly had no radiation-resistance capability.

Usually when these studies come about, they fall into the type of category I like to call…

provocative(Or if you wish, intriguing…)

There was clearly some type of change going on in E. coli in the presence of cell phone radiation. Whatever it was somehow aided in resisting antibiotics.

This was not an evolutionary shift, mind you. It was instead a reaction to the presence of cell phone radiation. After getting used to the new environment, the bacteria went back to normal and started dying again.

From a microbiological perspective, this result definitely is worth following up. If we can figure out what is happening at the molecular level, we may be able to identify new coping mechanisms in the bacteria. We may also find new targets for therapy.

But in regards to the question posed in the title of this post, the best response happens to be…

no(Especially if you’re reading this post on your cell phone…)

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